LITURGY, LECTORS, and THE EUCHARIST

Ellen Harper

Pat Deacon

 

Liturgy is the bringing of the Word of God and the Body and Blood of Christ to community members of Christ.

For more information concerning the Liturgical Ministry, and Lectors, contact Ellen Harper at: liturgy@stfrancisyulee.org 

For more information concerning the Eucharistic Ministry: Contact Pat Deacon at: eucharisticministry@stfrancisyulee.org

(Adults and Children)


Are you bored with nothing to do?

Do you have a “calling” to get involved within the church?

Our beautiful church and community are growing and the church needs your help.

Our 9:30 Family Mass is a special time where parishioners love to see our younger generation participating. We would love to see more children participating in the Mass as Ushers, Lectors, Altar Servers and Extraordinary Eucharistic Ministers (must be 16 or older). No experience is required. Training will be provided for all positions.

Just once or twice a month would be a great service, not only to the church, but to the Lord.

SACRAMENTS

Anointing of the Sick


Although the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick may be celebrated for those who are not near death, we sometimes celebrate the Sacrament as part of what is called Last Rites. These rites include Reconciliation, Anointing the Sick, and Eucharist and are meant to prepare a person as he or she nears the end of the earthly life and begins the eternal one.

The Eucharist given to a dying person is called Viaticum, which means, “food for the journey.” These sacraments are the means by which Christ offers spiritual healing to a dying person. Those who celebrate these Sacraments often experience great peace as they approach death.


The aged and ill should feel free to contact the office, (904) 849-1256 about Holy Communion or Anointing of the Sick.

Baptism – First Sacrament of Belonging


For too many Christians baptism is something that happened in the past and rid us of original sin. While that is true, there is more. The most startling effect of baptism is that we are not left orphans – God makes us sons and daughters (members of the body of Christ) by sharing with us divine life. All of the goodness we do in our life flows from the basic relationship with the Almighty. Growing in our Easter faith means that we are growing in our identity as those who are in intimate relationship with God. Each time we say yes to doing God’s will – keeping his commandments – we are growing in our intimate relationship with God. Thus baptism is a sacrament that permeates all we are and everything we do. At Easter we renewed our baptismal promises and all through the Easter season we use the blessing and sprinkling of water to remind us of our baptism. All this takes place at this particular time of the year for good reason – that we equate our resurrection faith with growing in our love of God.

The Sacrament of Baptism is a serious obligation and requires a faith commitment on the part of the parents. This commitment is exemplified by being a practicing, active Catholic, having been registered in the Catholic Mission of St. Francis of Assisi for at least 3 months prior to the Baptism.

Parents seeking Baptism for their child should contact the office to register for the REQUIRED Baptismal Preparation Class.  The sign-up must be done at least 2 weeks before the offered date. Baptisms are scheduled individually for every family.

The class takes place the 2nd Saturday of each month at 2:00 p.m. in the “Cry Room.”


Please call the office, (904) 849-1256, for an appointment.

Confirmation


Confirmation is a Sacrament of Christian Initiation. Through Conformation our baptismal grace is perfected, and through the power of the Holy Spirit, our faith is strengthened. Conformation strengthens our bond with the Church and helps us bear witness to our faith in our words and actions.

The anointing of the forehead with chrism, a perfumed oil, “marks” the confirmed forever with the spiritual seal of the Holy Spirit; that is, the anointed is recognized as belonging to Christ and his Church. The spiritual and indelible mark, like that of Baptism, means that the sacrament can be conferred only once.

The Holy Eucharist


The Holy Eucharist is a sacrament and a sacrifice. In the Holy Eucharist, under the appearances of bread and wine, the Lord Christ is contained, offered, and received.

The whole Christ is really, truly, and substantially present in the Holy Eucharist. We use the words “really, truly, and substantially” to describe Christ’s presence in the Holy Eucharist in order to distinguish Our Lord’s teaching from that of mere men who falsely teach that the Holy Eucharist is only a sign or figure of Christ, or that He is present only by His power.


The homebound should feel free to contact the office, (904) 849-1256, about receiving Holy Communion at their home.

Holy Orders


Holy Orders is one of the Sacraments of Service. Members of the ministerial priesthood guide the laity in the development of their faith. The ordained serve the Church community in the name and person of Jesus. There are three degrees of Holy Orders–deacon, priest, and bishop.

Through the Sacrament of Holy Orders, Jesus confers the grace that allows the ordained– Deacons, priests, and bishops to act in the name of Christ. These representatives of Christ, consecrated in Holy Orders, constitute the ministerial priesthood. They continue Christ’s work by preaching the word and celebrating the sacraments.

Others who recognize and follow the call serve the Body Of Christ may elect to do so by joining a religious community, choosing a marriage partner, or remaining single.

These people, too, are a part of the priesthood – the common priesthood of all the faithful.

Matrimony


God gives us a great gift when we meet someone with whom we want to share our lives. When a man and a woman decide to spend their lives together, they are gifts to each other. They agree to live together, united in heart and mind, body and spirit. By celebrating the Sacrament of Matrimony. The relationship at the center of a marriage brings great love and joy. God intends marriage for love and happiness of husband and wife and for their joy in the birth of any children they may have.

The Sacrament of Matrimony is a celebration of this love giving and life giving relationship. It creates and maintain a bond between a man and a woman as well as the couple and God. The faithful love that a couple shares is a reflection of God’s love for all of us.


A minimum of 8 months’ notice is required by the Diocese of St. Augustine because of the sacredness and the seriousness of this Sacrament.  

Please contact the office (904) 849-1256 for an appointment.

Reconciliation


The Catholic Sacrament of Reconciliation (also known as Confession or Penance) has three elements: conversion, confession and celebration.

In it we find God’s unconditional forgiveness; as a result we are called to forgive others.


Confession is on Saturday from 3:00 pm – 3:45 pm, or by appointment

A Word from Deacon Brian


Please consider having your civil marriage convalidated in the Catholic Church here at St. Francis. It is a blessing and much more. Convalidation returns your marriage to the grace of the sacraments, the beauty of full participation in our community, and strongly witnesses your faith to family and friends.

EVENTS

The Events Ministry was established to help create and organize different events for the parish of St. Francis. Events, both large and small, are an important part of building our parish and our community, for it is at these events where we have the opportunity not only to serve, but to meet, work with, and get to know our fellow brothers and sisters in Christ. Events come in all shapes and sizes, and are organized by different members of the parish. Some events are held to raise money, while other events are for community and fellowship. Bake sales, the Children’s Masses, and our monthly Bingo are just a few of our re-occurring events here at St. Francis, and we are always looking for new and exciting ways to serve our Lord and our community.Please contact the church, (904) 849-1256,  if you would like to volunteer for any of our current events, or if you would like to find out how you can be a part of this wonderful adventure.


For information concerning Events, contact: Cathy McKnight at:  events@stfrancisyulee.org

VOLUNTEERS

For more information on volunteers, contact Joe Dzwilefsky at:

volunteers@stfrancisyulee.org

BUILDING

For more information on Building, contact Ashley Powell at:

building@stfrancisyulee.org

 

Ashley has been working in the residential and commercial construction industries for over 15 years. She started with home building in the Atlanta area while in college and moved on to field rep work for a local architectural/engineering firm in Jacksonville on warehouse, office space, financial, etc. projects. She started her own consulting company 5 years ago and has been responsible for promoting and managing green building projects (hotels, office space, warehouse, animal care, recreation, etc.) with numerous clients, contractors, architects and engineers while also doing construction loan inspections for banks. She is very passionate about educating the community about green building practices and has spent the last few years attending expos and doing green community service projects. She is also on the Board of the United States Green Building Council (USGBC) of Northeast Florida Chapter and has also been involved in their Nassau Committee, Awards Committee, and Building Tours Committee. Earlier this year, she also joined the Keep Nassau Beautiful Board. She graduated from Georgia Tech with a degree in Civil Engineering and later received her MBA from the University of North Florida.

USHERS

For information concerning the Usher Ministry, contact:

Steve Borusovic at:  ushers@stfrancisyulee.org

HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

History of Usher/Greeters in the Catholic Church


The ministry of usher/greeters is the oldest lay ministry in the Catholic Church. In the old Testament usher/greeters were called “gatekeepers.” Their ministry was so important that they were given living quarters in the temple.

According to I Chronicles 9, their duties included opening the temple every morning, providing care and protection for all the precious vessels, preparing certain food items used in ritual sacrifices, and guarding the temple. By the time of Christ, these gatekeepers had become known as the “Temple Guard.” They were ordered to arrest Jesus, but according to John 7 they instead became interested in Jesus’ message.

By the third century A.D., a clerical order known as “porters” (overseers of the doors)  was instituted. During those times, it was the duty of the porters, or usher/greeters, to guard the door of the church against any intruders who might disturb the service. The porters’ duties were so important that they came to be included in the rite of ordination, where they were to ring the bells, open the church, and to open the book for the pastor. In 1972 Pope Paul VI abolished the order of porter and this important task was given over to the laity.

While today’s usher/greeters don’t ring the bells or open the church, their primary duties and responsibilities include greeting and welcoming parishioners as they enter the church, helping them to find seats, taking up the collection and wishing to everyone a good day at the conclusion of the Eucharistic Celebration.

Ushers are the first exposure of church attendees to our liturgies. As such, we want to greet people with a welcoming attitude to our church.  This includes answering any questions they may have, assisting them in finding seating, if required, and identifying people with mobility issues who may need to have the Eucharistic brought to their seats.

In addition, ushers also assist in the smooth flow of the liturgy, by assisting the sacristan with Mass setup, as needed and identifying people to carry the Offertory gifts. Ushers also take the Offertory collection and direct the traffic flow for reception of Holy Communion. In addition, ushers count the number of people at Mass and enter the number in the log book in the sacristy. At the conclusion of Mass, they also pass out the church bulletins while wishing attendees a pleasant day, take the collection basket and transfer donations into plastic envelopes which we mark with date and Mass time, seal the envelope and place in the safe and finally, assist the sacristan with lock up if required.

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